Rich Strolis demonstrates how to tie Case Closed, a cased caddis pattern that works wonders in the spring on freestone rivers such as Rich’s home stream, the Farmington River in Connecticut. This pattern will do the trick on any river where Caddisflies are abundant. A great pattern that only uses 3 materials and is featured…

 

Rich Strolis demonstrates how to tie his 2-Fly Dry, a three step surface pattern that can imitate stoneflies and caddis flies on the top of the waters surface. This fly rides flush in the film and fools even the wariest of trout. 2-Fly Dry Material List Hook: TMC 100, size 10 – 20 Thread: UTC…

 

Rich Strolis of Catching Shadows demonstrates in this fly tying video how to tie his Rock Candy Caddis Larva, a virtually bomb-proof Caddis larva fly pattern that also passes for a grub imitation when tied in the larger sizes. Body by Rock Candy The Strolis Rock Candy Caddis larva features a pretty unique material, Sybai…

 

Rich Strolis of Catching Shadows shows us in this fly tying video how to tie his Sticky Icky, another easy to tie Caddis larva pattern that also passes for a grub imitation. Chewy Caddis Larva The Sticky Icky Caddis larva gets its’ name from the [easyazon_link asin=”B005TIPCDS” locale=”US” new_window=”default” nofollow=”default” tag=”flyfishrep-20″ add_to_cart=”default” cloaking=”default” localization=”default” popups=”default”]UV…

 

Earlier this week I ran a Mother’s Day special on Elk Hair figuring it would tie in nicely with tonight’s Friday Night Fly Tying Video featuring a Mother’s Day Caddis fly pattern. Who knew that Mother’s Day is actually a week from Sunday not this Sunday? Well, apparently I got that a little mixed up….

 


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Tying caddis doesn’t get any easier than this simple Grannom cased caddis imitation by Aaron Jasper of Trout Predator Online.

Caddis Life Cyle

The caddis fly life cycle consists of four stages: egg, larval, pupa and adult. Caddis spend the majority of the life cycle (typically a year) in the larval stage during which caddis form a cocoon-like casing or silk netting to both protect and camouflage themselves from predators – like hungry trout. As a result, the caddis larvae represent a significant year round food source for trout.

Grannom Caddis

Grannom Caddis (Brachycentrus) are present in both Eastern and Western US rivers and prefer riffles and runs with moderate to fast currents, typically attaching their casings to rocks on the stream bottom. Cased larvae, including the Grannom, are prone to behavioral drift (where they periodical let go of their grip on the river bottom and float downstream) and are sometimes knocked loose by the current. As a result, a cased caddis pattern such as this one dead-drifted near the bottom can be highly effective year round.

Fly Tying Video Gallery

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